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It was close to 3 a.

m. on June 6 when Courtland Kelley burst into his bedroom, startling his wife awake. General Motors , Kelley’s employer for more than 30 years, had just released the results of an investigation into how a flawed ignition switch in the Chevrolet Cobalt could easily slip into the “off” position—cutting power, stalling the engine, and disabling airbags just when they’re needed most. The part has been linked to at least 13 deaths and 54 crashes. GM Chief Executive Officer Mary Barra, summoned before Congress in April to answer for the crisis, repeatedly declined to answer lawmakers’ questions before she had the company’s inquest in hand. Now it was out, and Kelley had stayed up to read all 325 pages on a laptop on the back porch of his rural home about 90?miles northwest of Detroit.

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Investigation Shows That GM Was PUNISHING Employees Who Spoke Out On Safety

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